Our Supporters

Many thanks to the following for their voluntary support as NOCS began its journey as a charity

Bournemouth University, School of Journalism, English and Communication – for photography and videos

Dan Holbeche – for holding the fort and photography

Dorset Community Action – for advice, training and support with becoming a charity

Game On, Blandford for running a Gamethon fundraiser for us.

Leah Scott for her great artwork

Noc’s Box for continuing to fund and run the groups and activities in their tiny space while we grow the charity

Shannon Ribbons at Osis Design for this fantastic website

Tom Gamwell for redeveloping the Noc’s Box website and social media

TMS for donations

…and our Trustees, of course.

Already there are many other people helping in lots of different ways. THANK YOU – you know who you are!

Support NOCS

We are looking for people to help with:

Planning and running local fundraising events.

Marketing and PR

Researching funders and preparing bids.

If you have any time spare to help NOCS grow and support more people please contact us now

Testimonials

“Harry was introduced to the shop by an able relative.  He was a long term NEET, with a range of registered difficulties, including learning and social skills.  He relied on his family for security and acceptance, having very few successful friendships.  He was not happy and had great difficulty in interacting with anyone without causing upset, intruding on personal boundaries and space, or being demeaning. It took some time to help him to accept that there are rules for behaviour when in NOCS, but with patience and the consistency of guidance from Noc and the other members, he started to develop a much more positive approach. Noc took Harry through development of one-to-one games, modelling how to handle losing a  game, gamesmanship etc…  He also made a point of reading out the rules for conduct at the beginning of any tournaments, or times when there may have been increased excitement, as part of the development for Harry. Harry gradually began to build relationships that were positive and became part of the NOCS community, gradually needing the presence of his family less and less.  Now Harry has secured a job, coped with moving away from family and developed his own transport, and is generally much more independent.  He no longer needs NOCS but still drops in from time to time.”